“I believe in the sun, even when it does not shine. I believe in love, even when I do not feel it. I believe in God, even when I cannot see Him”.

(Warsaw ghetto wall)

Free Heart

Free heart

To William Wallace

Freedom. It never is word, is always alive expression of true feeling. It is an ideal and an undeniable value that everyone needs and should exercise. Without Freedom we are deprived of being, without her, simply no longer we are.

One is free in the decision making, regardless of the pressures in relation to the course of action. Even in situations limits it is chosen, feeling like a friend of the recklessness, courage or cowardice, without mattering by which of them it is being accompanied, adopting an attitude towards any circumstance. But Freedom is not free will, it is acceptance responsible for the consequences of those actions we decide to undertake.

There are subject men who feel limited  to the  destiny without questioning it or defying it; others are those that, deprived of the comfortable performance and action, defy everything without concerning the risks, being fearless and no longer brave because they know  that without Her, without Freedom, nothing else matters.

Which would be our last words?

“I tell you a truth, Liberty is the best of all things, my son, never live under any slavish bond”. 

Those were the words pronounced by William Wallace before its exemplary confrontation with death 23 of August 1305

I observethe sky and attempt to feel everything what it leaves us by message the revolutionary Scot who refused to live without being free and preferred to die fighting by his right convictions of libertarian flag.

He belonged to an oppressed class and of enslaved treatment deprived to choose to be as they wanted to be.  He endured the English aggression, who never felt that someone else could feel. They lost all shame obtaining lose the complete respect to them.

Enslaved condition was worse than death itself; the death by freedom no longer was loss but surrender so others could live free. He decided to face the impossible thing. He preferred to dream and not to fear for what they entail, worse nothing would be and triumph it would not be it in greater degree.

The leader arose who played the restless desire to act, the strength personified the dream. He knew how to seduce the hearts that courted the revolutionary path. He accepted the consequences that of his actions would follow and urged the others do likewise. He knew that his example would be determining and wasconsequent with his principles. He fought by them, no longer by him. It did not concern because he had understood the libertarian sense, what concerned him was that the others reached the experience of feeling no another thing beyond the crazy desire of being free. He could not himself feel free when the ones around him would not feel free themselves, as a leader he could not save himself but to seek the way for all to see the pointed star. His life did not matter, it was necessary the recklessness to raise bravery.  The risk of prudence could have been interpreted as a weak cowardice.

He was eager to face death. He did not seek for it, he defied it. He understood that the meaning of life grants the final instance. He knew that men would face death as a single accurate destiny in existence. The difference and particularity would be manifested at that moment where will be tested the experience of senses and be proven.

It can be that a tear, daughter of the impotence, the one that has run down his cheek to fall to the ground. It did, finally free. It would expect with open arms to another one. That tear, perhaps, was surprised by a companion who had just fallen too, but this one was bright red, colour of the blood and it was not a product of impotence but of the injustice. The first tear was afraid and asked the second who it was and this responded: “The sacrifice made us free.”

Today I listen again to the cry that from his heart was born, with the poetic passion of the final act, arriving to the present time… FREEDOM!!

Translated by Anabella Monticello